Pallative
Start Date 07/10/10
Duration 4 Days
Full/Part-time Full-Time
Funding No
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Career Opportunities & Progression

On completion of this module, the participant will have achieved a FETAC credit in A Palliative Care Approach Component Certificate FETAC Level 5 D20170. This qualification will equip the participant with insights and strategies in the professional care of the elderly.

 

FETAC Palliative Care Component Certificate Level 5

The module is designed to equip the learner with the knowledge and skills of the palliative care approach to enable them to care for the person diagnosed with a life-limiting illness and, in the last days of a person’s life and also his/her family in a dignified and holistic way.

Pre-requisites

This course is open to all with general work/life experience. Participants should be in occupational roles sufficient to allow them reflect upon the practical implications of palliative care. It is a suitable course for those with a significant professional interest in areas such as Health Care and Community Care.

Course Aim

This course is designed to provide practical knowledge and skills of the palliative care approach.  Specifically participants will be enabled to:

  • Provide holistic care for persons diagnosed with a life- limiting illness and in the last days of a person’s life and also for their families, carers and significant others.  
  • Communicate effectively with persons with a life-limiting illness and in the last days of a person’s life and also with their families, carers and significant others.  
  • Enhance the quality of life of the person with a life- limiting illness.  
  • Recognise and respect the uniqueness of each person’s approach to death work effectively as part of the healthcare team.  

Principal Areas of Study

Working with A Palliative Care Approach 

  • Define the terms ‘palliative care’ and ‘end-of-life care’  
  • Explain the terms ‘cancer’ and a ‘life-limiting illness’  
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the philosophy and principles of palliative care. 
  • Outline the role of national end-of-life care standards. 
  • Outline the structure and organisation of specialist palliative care services. 
  • Understand the roles and responsibilities of the specialist palliative care team and the multi-disciplinary team, when caring for a person diagnosed with a life-limiting illness. 
  • Recognise the diversity of family structures and their supportive role as the primary carers. 
  • Identify common fears and anxieties that may be experienced by the person diagnosed with a life-limiting illness and also by his/her family, carers and significant others. 
  • Demonstrate a sensitive approach to persons experiencing altered body image. 
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the support worker, in promoting the following for a person diagnosed with a lifelimiting illness:
    •  self esteem and a sense of worth.
    • autonomy and respect for personal decision making. 
    • quality of life.    
  • Reflect on environmental issues which impact on palliative care and end of life care provision. 
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact on the person, his/her family, carers and significant others of being diagnosed with a life-limiting illness and their associated coping mechanisms.  
  • Reflect on their own coping mechanisms for dealing with personal losses from the past.

Communication Skills  

  •  Demonstrate effective communication skills with those who display emotions such as anger, fear, sadness, depression, withdrawal or confusion.  
  • Demonstrate effective communication skills with those who have communication difficulties, for example hearing impairment or speech difficulties.  
  • Identify personal strengths and weaknesses in communicating with the dying person and his/her family, carers and significant others.  
  • Reflect on the influence of personal attitudes and feelings when communicating with dying persons and their families.  
  • Promote an environment that allows the dying person and his/her family, carers and significant others to express fears and emotions, including the use of touch and silence. 
  • Demonstrate an understanding of cultural and religious diversity, in relation to caring for a person, diagnosed with a life-limiting illness, his/her family, carers and significant others and also in the last days and hours of life.  
  • Observe the role of the various members of the healthcare team when communicating information to the dying person and his/her family.  
  • Communicate information received from the dying person and his/her family to members of the healthcare team.  
  • Identify strategies for seeking advice and assistance from members of the healthcare team. 

Death and Dying 

  • Describe a person-centred approach to caring for a person in the last days of their life.  
  • Provide supportive, holistic care for the person while promoting safety, dignity, respect and comfort. 
  • Identify the role of the support worker, in meeting the needs of the person during the last days of life, who is experiencing. 
    • Total pain  
    • Fatigue  
    • Nausea and vomiting  
    • Breathlessness  
    • Constipation  
    • Diarrhoea  
    • Sore mouth/dry mouth  
    • Swallowing difficulties  
    • Altered state of consciousness 
  • Identify the role of the support worker in meeting the needs of the person with a syringe driver or a medication patch.  
  • Respond appropriately to the needs of the person who is confused or restless in the last days and hours of life.  
  • Recognise the diverse signs and symptoms that death is imminent.  
  • Carry out duties after a person has died, in accordance with local workplace policy and in a way that is respectful to the deceased person and their belongings.  
  • Recognise the needs of specific vulnerable groups, in relation to death, dying and bereavement. For example:  
    • Children  
    • People with intellectual disabilities  
    • People with mental health problems

     Bereavement Care 

    • Demonstrate an understanding of individual patterns of grief and loss. 
    • Explain why the support worker must respond sensitively to the family, carers and significant others and also other patients/ service users and colleagues when a patient/ service user is dying and after they die.  
    • Demonstrate awareness that some people’s grief may go unrecognised. For example:  
    • People with intellectual disabilities. 
    • Divorced or separated spouses. 
    • People living or working in residential care settings. 
    • Demonstrate awareness of how to access bereavement information and the services and support available to families, carers, significant others and themselves.  

    Work Experience  

    A minimum of 10 hours work experience to be completed during the module in a Nursing Home environment or caring for an elderly person in a domestic environment.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

A combination of appropriate assessment procedures will facilitate the assessment of learning outcomes of the course.  

Assignment 30%  

Learning Record 70% 

Awards

On completion of this module, the participant will have achieved one of eight modules which lead to a National Certificate in Health Care Support FETAC LEVEL 5.

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